The Space Beween Things:

The Observer: Read here…
The Times: Read here…
Sabotage: Read here…
Spiked Online: Read here…
Spike Magazine: Read here…
The Guardian: Read here…

‘Every city in Britain has its Moseley, the edgy, arty Birmingham anti-suburb where the studes and the crusties come to rent and squat. Fuelled by skunk, benefit cheques, creative aspirations and plenty of time on their hands, they try everything, do nothing and pop out for some lager. Charlie Hill’s intelligent and witty The Space Between Things captures their culture with brutal, unpretentious clarity. his novel charts the years between Moseley’s first rave and the height of the road protests, an age of well-meaning self-indulgence, where the partying never ends but the politics never really get going. It is, like the suburb itself, playful, unruly and bursting with generous energy’ Jim Crace

‘What I like very much about this novel is that it vividly captures a moment in Britain’s recent past, and takes us inside a world and a milieu which most readers won’t have known before. And of course, as tragic love story, it packs a considerable punch’ Jonathan Coe

Books:

London Review of Books: Read here…
Financial Times: Read here…
Morning Star: Read here…
Bookmunch: Read here…
Charles Lambert: Read here…
Ashley Stokes: Read here…
Art of Fiction: Read here…
The Book Bag: Read here…
Savidge Reads: Read here…

STUFF:

This Space: Read here…

Bookmunch: Read here…

Random Things Through my Letterbox: Read here…

Never Imitate: Read here…

‘Sensitive, evocative and touching, Stuff begins with a density of detail and then sheds names, memories, family, home and belongings as the narrator leads the reader to a brink’ Alison Moore

Writing that manages to be robust and delicate at the same time. A real achievement’ Charles Lambert

A great 30 page ‘descent’ story, like Gerard Donovan’s ‘Harry Dietz’ story, or a number of Becketts (there’s a direct link in the final sentences). Ennui leading to an existential crisis, but involving Stirchley Bowl, work emails and cold water prawns. I loved it, couldn’t see how it could be improved’ Alan Beard